Tropical Storm Colin: System downgraded to tropical depression

MIAMI — Tropical Storm Colin swirled to life off the South Carolina coast early Saturday, bringing heavy rains to the Carolina coasts during the Fourth of July weekend.

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Update 11:25 p.m. EDT July 2: The National Hurricane Center downgraded the short-lived Tropical Storm Colin to a tropical depression late Saturday.

Per its 11 p.m. EDT advisory, the NHC confirmed that Colin was located about 15 miles north of Wilmington, North Carolina and that all associated coastal warnings were discontinued.

The depression, which is moving northeast at 7 mph, has maximum sustained winds of 35 mph, the NHC stated.

Per the forecast, additional weakening is likely, and Colin is expected to degenerate to a remnant area of low pressure early Sunday, while the storm’s remnants are expected to continue moving northeastward along or just inland of the North Carolina coast through Sunday afternoon.

The system is expected to dissipate completely Sunday night or Monday, the NHC stated.

Update 5:17 p.m. EDT July 2: Tropical Storm Colin was becoming more disorganized as it meandered up the North Carolina coast. In its 5 p.m. EDT advisory, the National Hurricane Center said that Colin was located about 70 miles west-southwest of Wilmington, North Carolina.

The storm still had maximum sustained winds of 40 mph and was moving to the northeast at 7 mph.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for Cape Fear to Duck, North Carolina north to Pamlico Sound, the hurricane center said. The storm will continue to produce heavy rainfall across coastal portions of North Carolina and northern South Carolina through Sunday morning.

Update 3:15 p.m. EDT July 2: Tropical Storm Colin remained disorganized as it brought heavy rains and strong winds to the North Carolina coast.

A tropical storm warning is in effect for the area north of Little River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina * Pamlico Sound.

The center of the storm was located 10 miles west-southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, according to the National Hurricane Center’s 2 p.m. EDT intermediate advisory. Maximum sustained winds remained at 40 mph near the storm, which continues to move to the northeast at 7 mph.

Update 10:59 a.m. EDT July 2: The center of Tropical Storm Colin was hovering about five miles west of Myrtle Beach, the National Hurricane Center said in its 11 a.m. EDT advisory. Maximum sustained winds remained just above the threshold for a tropical storm at 40 mph, and the storm slightly slowed down, moving northeast at 7 mph.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect from South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina, including Pamlico Sound, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Update 7:58 a.m. EDT July 2: The center of the third-named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season was located inland, about 25 miles west-southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, the National Hurricane Center said in its 8 a.m. EDT advisory.

Little change was expected in the storm’s movement or intensity, the hurricane center said. The storm was moving northeast at 8 p.m. and is expected to take a turn to the northeast by late Sunday before moving into the western Atlantic Ocean by Monday.

Original report: The center of the third-named storm of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season was located about 40 miles southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, the National Hurricane Center said in its 5 a.m. EDT advisory.

Colin’s maximum sustained winds were 40 mph and the storm was moving northeast at 8 mph.

A tropical storm warning is in effect from South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina, including Pamlico Sound, according to the National Hurricane Center.

While winds will not be a concern, the hurricane center said that Colin will produce heavy rains across portions of coastal South Carolina and North Carolina through Sunday morning. Some areas can expect to receive up to 4 inches of rain and forecasters warn of flash flooding.

The storm is expected to hug the coastal areas before turning northeastward into the western Atlantic Ocean sometime Sunday, the hurricane center said.